Jan
11
2018

PACE Continues Florida Engagement on Deregulation

On Friday, the Florida Constitution Revision Commission will once again examine deregulation of the wholesale and retail electricity markets. PACE will testify, as we did in December, to share our views and research on why deregulation doesn’t work for consumers.

Dear Chair Thurlow-Lippisch:

Thank you for reconvening the General Provisions Committee on January 12 for a portion of the morning to further discuss Proposal 51. The Partnership for Affordable Clean Energy will appear again in order to shed light on why Florida should not enshrine complex electricity policy in its Constitution and explain why the Texas electricity market isn’t

Jan
09
2018

Baby, It's Cold Outside

The great majority of U.S. citizens east of the Mississippi have engaged in popular January 2018 conversations – first, “it is so, so [insert profanity of choice] cold outside.” In the greater D.C. metropolitan area, that is quickly followed by “why are the [choose another profanity] schools closed AGAIN?” Involuntary confinement to home offices has allowed energy policy observers to freely opine on the impacts of winter storms and the deep-freeze. Articles and blogs are piling up like …

While “Deep Freeze 2018” (there isn’t yet a catchy “Polar Vortex” phrase for this event, and “snow bomb” doesn’t apply

Jan
02
2018

The Best Resolutions are Made at Home

With champagne flutes and noisemakers safely stored away, many of us turn to making New Year’s resolutions. These vary widely, but usually have one thing in common – we select them and measure success or failure ourselves. Wise partners and friends know to give advice only if asked. In short, one size doesn’t fit all, and mandates backfire.

Over the holiday break, I was reminded that local officials should adopt this same approach when it comes to one of the most important transactions that a family encounters – buying or selling a home. Lots of ink has already been devoted

Nov
28
2017

The Disaster of Deregulation

Earlier this year, PACE shared some thoughts about deregulation of the electric power retail markets and why it doesn’t make sense for consumers. With state legislatures across the country gearing up for 2018 sessions, it seems timely to touch on the topic again. When it comes to deregulating (or restructuring) retail electricity markets, the song remains the same. Nearly two decades of experimentation, creation of complicated behemoth markets and establishment of cumbersome oversight mechanisms has rarely, if ever, produced meaningful cost savings or competition.

Pushed by giant casinos and renewable advocates, Nevada’s Public Service Commission has recently created a new

Nov
14
2017

State Regulators Advance Critical Energy Conversations

The nation’s regulatory utility commissioners are gathered in Baltimore, Maryland for their 129th annual meeting. I’m pleased to represent PACE and raise awareness about our partnerships all across the country and our mission of driving policies that deliver reliable, affordable energy to consumers.

It’s not just the brisk, wintry temperatures here in Baltimore keeping attendees focused on where consumers will get their energy and what it will cost. Several sessions across the 4 days of meetings delve into these important questions.

The Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) convened an early morning breakfast yesterday to discuss the pending Federal Trade Commission

Oct
31
2017

Put Infrastructure Back on the Front Burner

Today PACE welcomes a guest blog from our Board Chairman, Cline Jones. Cline is the Executive Director of the Tennessee River Valley Authority and its associated organization, the Tennessee-Cumberland Waterways Council.

As the calendar pages turn, and the end of 2017 draws near, it’s timely to assess progress on one of our country’s most important goals – maintenance and improvement of infrastructure.

The Tennessee River Valley Association (TRVA) and the Tennessee-Cumberland Waterways Council (TCWC) bring together business and industry, transportation, financial services, education, chambers of commerce, all levels of government and many other stakeholders. Our

Oct
10
2017

D.C. Energy News, Inside and Out

During Columbus Day week, the U.S. House of Representatives will be in session, although the Senate is on recess. With very few legislative days left in this first session of the current Congress, the most significant activity on energy will take the form of nominations and hearings looking ahead at 2018 issues. I’ve been lucky to split time the last 4 weeks (commercial flights only!) between D.C. and states far outside the beltway, getting a small glimpse of how D.C. news plays in the real world.

The constant meme about the lack of key figures in the

Oct
03
2017

Lessons on America's Power Supply Formula

The utility industry, the federal government and numerous NGOs are on the ground helping our 3.4 million fellow citizens in Puerto Rico. The Salvation Army is on the front lines and collecting much-needed donations. Our concern also extends to the victims and families impacted by the terrible events in Las Vegas.

In the wake of the hurricane trifecta of Irma, Harvey, and Maria, more Americans than usual may be thinking about power supply. Luckily, so are leading voices in Washington, D.C. and around state capitols. An already healthy debate about what sources our country uses to generate electricity, and

Sep
28
2017

The Impressionist Energy Policy Landscape

The utility industry, the federal government and numerous NGOs are on the ground helping our 3.4 million fellow citizens in Puerto Rico. The Salvation Army is on the front lines and collecting much-needed donations.

As we ease into fall in Washington, D.C., there’s very little talk left of comprehensive energy bills. Yet, small developments and conversations keep going, adding bits of color and light to the energy policy landscape. It’s akin to an Impressionist painting at this time; general outlines are there, but interpretation of the overall scene depends greatly on your vantage point.

PACE

Sep
19
2017

Anticipating Energy Issues in Tax Reform

As Carly Simon sang decades ago, “anticipation, anticipation, it’s makin’ me late, it’s keepin’ me waitin’.” “Anticipation” could be the theme song of the week here in Washington, D.C., where several thousand people are getting ready (again) for release of the Republican tax reform plan.

Rumors are circulating that “everything is on the table,” meaning every interest group is gearing up to protect current provisions that lower their constituents’ tax bills and therefore cost the Treasury money.

Even amid all the anticipation, long-time tax-watchers know disappointment could be next week’s story line. Still, something seems