Aug
30
2018

Teaching Future Consumers Energy ABCs

This week’s guest blog is by Mark Justice, Director of Education and Community Relations at Cobb EMC. Mark provides leadership for member education, public relations, and public and media information. Cobb EMC, a not-for-profit electric cooperative, serves a large, diverse population in suburban Atlanta, Georgia. Their efforts to educate students and schools about energy are making a difference and are worth duplicating across the country.

Each school year brings opportunities to help young people learn about the energy sector. Students, elementary to college, are interested in electricity and related energy topics. What could be better than to have them

Aug
23
2018

Summer Heat = Increased Need for Energy Assistance

 

During hot summer months when many households rely on air conditioning to stay cool, energy suppliers across the Southeast are prepared to help low-income customers in need of assistance coping with energy bills. This summer, it’s been really hot across America. As part of the National Energy and Utility Affordability Coalition’s August LIHEAP action month campaign, we’re spotlighting the Southeast region’s growing need for the federal Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP).

LIHEAP is a federally-funded block grant program, heralding from the early days of the Reagan Administration. Grants are made to states, tribes and territories to

May
24
2018

Smarter Ways Forward with The Ray

Frequently, PACE talks about consumers’ interest in transportation from a fuel supply angle (oil pipelines) or integrating new technologies (electric vehicles). Many big thinkers are attempting to envision how, when and at what cost energy, telecommunications and transportation will converge. Many laudable “Smart Cities” projects and pilots with broad scopes of inquiry are underway.

While sweeping inquiries are useful, it’s also beneficial to focus more closely on a set of questions and issues. More discrete sets of information often have a better chance of getting and holding people’s attention. Those who live and work far from cities should also

May
03
2018

Georgia: Doing its Part for Nuclear, Solar & National Security - While Keeping Rates Low

This week, PACE is pleased to feature a guest blog by Dr. David Gattie, a faculty member at the University of Georgia with deep expertise in energy policy, and co-author of our 2017 paper on net metering.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration recently released new data for 2017, so I compiled a few statistics for some of the top GDPs in the U.S. In particular, average residential rates since 1990 (Figure 1) and the energy portfolios for those states (Figure 2). Since my home state is Georgia and we’re working toward the completion of the only nuclear reactors under

Apr
20
2018

Springtime in D.C. - Cold, Sunny, Chance of Hearings and Orders

PACE got a taste of warm weather, sunshine and BBQ last week, visiting with Cobb EMC, a progressive urban/suburban electric cooperative just outside Atlanta that serves over 200,000 meters. Cobb’s board and leadership team are responding adeptly to consumer demand for renewable energy by making significant investments in utility-scale solar. PACE also visited the Southern States Energy Board (we joined SSEB earlier this year) to discuss energy and environmental issues that are top-of mind to the elected officials in SSEB’s sixteen state, two territory membership.

Returning to D.C., I found that with Easter recess in the rearview mirror, the springtime

Mar
20
2018

Driving an EV: The Promise and Hazards

PACE is honored to feature guest commentary by Commissioner Chuck Eaton, of the Georgia Public Service Commission.

I love technology and innovation and consider myself an early adopter. I could not wait to get an Apple Watch, and I purchased a Chevy Volt back in 2012 after extensive analysis. As an energy regulator in Georgia, I see both the upside and downside with electric vehicles.

Here’s what I mean.

Let’s start with the grid – one of my daily concerns. Electric cars actually help our grid in Georgia. Our Commission worked with the power company to create a

Feb
22
2018

Tax Extenders Will Make Plant Vogtle More Affordable

PACE is honored to re-publish a blog originally published by Georgia Tech’s Climate and Energy Policy Laboratory and authored by Dr. Marilyn A. Brown, who created and directs the CEPL.

On Friday, January 9, 2018, Congress passed and President Trump signed the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. This budget-busting bill will add an estimated $2 trillion to the U.S. debt over the next decade. But nestled within it is some good news for advocates of low-carbon energy solutions.

Earlier this month, a collection of energy tax extenders and incentives was added to the Congressional budget deal. They will support

Dec
12
2017

Vogtle 3 and 4 Still Common Sense for Georgia

The Georgia Public Service Commission is once again holding hearings and taking public testimony on the merits of proceeding with construction of Units 3 and 4 at Plant Vogtle. This week’s Vogtle Construction Monitoring (VCM) hearings have, as usual, included spirited debate, sometimes set to ukulele music. (As Florida’s sage Dave Barry used to say, “I am not making that up.”)

As the Commissioners and staff continue to closely and responsibly examine the costs and timelines for the massive construction project, they are being bombarded with half-truths and histrionics. But there are just as many rational voices in the debate,

Nov
07
2017

PACE Supports Vogtle 3 and 4

Partnership for Affordable Clean Energy

Statement in Support of Plant Vogtle Continued Construction

Docket 29849:

Georgia Power Company’s Seventeenth (17th) Vogtle Plant Construction Monitoring (VCM) Report

Georgia Public Service Commission

Monday, November 6, 2017

The Partnership for Affordable Clean Energy (PACE) strongly supports continued construction at Vogtle Units 3 and 4. Nuclear energy is already a critical resource in Georgia, boosting the economy and providing emission-free, base load power for 60-80 years. As a lifelong Georgian, I am proud of the efforts the co-owners have made and will

Nov
02
2017

Use Nuclear Energy to Address Climate Change

Dr. David K. Gattie is an Associate Professor of Engineering at the University of Georgia. Earlier this year, he co-authored PACE’s paper on net metering. We thank him for providing a guest blog drawing our attention to a smarter way forward on climate change policy.

I recently posted a commentary in The Hill explaining why the U.S. could do better than the Clean Power Plan (CPP). As always, I try to implore others to look at the bigger picture and see global climate change as the global issue it actually is and not just a U.S. issue only.