Apr
20
2018

Springtime in D.C. - Cold, Sunny, Chance of Hearings and Orders

PACE got a taste of warm weather, sunshine and BBQ last week, visiting with Cobb EMC, a progressive urban/suburban electric cooperative just outside Atlanta that serves over 200,000 meters. Cobb’s board and leadership team are responding adeptly to consumer demand for renewable energy by making significant investments in utility-scale solar. PACE also visited the Southern States Energy Board (we joined SSEB earlier this year) to discuss energy and environmental issues that are top-of mind to the elected officials in SSEB’s sixteen state, two territory membership.

Returning to D.C., I found that with Easter recess in the rearview mirror, the springtime

Oct
12
2017

Climate Policy Swings and Balloons

As anticipated since just after the November 2016 election, the Trump Administration, through Environmental Protection Agency Administrator (EPA) Scott Pruitt, has officially released documents that set the stage for repeal of the Clean Power Plan. PACE welcomes this move. The original CPP, especially its approach to existing plants, failed to adequately consider how the CPP would raise electricity costs and create lasting impacts on consumers. It deserved the nickname PACE and countless other groups gave it – a carbon reduction mandate.

Creation of the original CPP was complex and lengthy. It sprang into public view June 2013,

Jan
02
2017

New Year Offers Restart for American Energy

There can be little doubt that 2017 will witness one of the most dramatic ground shifts in American policy in recent history. The election of Donald Trump, victories by Republicans in both the U.S. House and Senate, and geopolitical pressures that continue to mount are all conspiring to create a new political landscape in our nation. We know with certainty that this administration will be markedly different than the last one, but will it be like any other? Or will it be completely uncharted territory? And most important from our point of view, what will this new landscape mean for

Jan
21
2011

EPA and FERC to model impact of regulations on energy reliability

Today, Energy Washington Week reported that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be working with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to model “the potential for coal-fired power plant closures prompted by pending EPA climate, water, and other rules.” According to the FERC chairman, the modeling “could provide vital new data to help in planning a strategy for addressing any generating capacity loss resulting from plant closures.” With the EPA in the process of implementing regulations on power plants, petroleum refiners, and other “stationary sources” of pollutants, as determined by the EPA, the news of the modeling is good.

Nov
23
2010

WSJ Editorial on EPA Regulations

Our nation has many things for which to be thankful this week, and I encourage everyone to try to forget, at least for one day, about the contention of the recent elections or the continued economic crisis and instead focus on quality time with family and friends.

However, I felt inclined to take a few minutes away from feasting and football to draw attention to the Wall Street Journal’s excellent editorial this week, “The EPA Permitorium,” which ran just in time for Thanksgiving dinner discussions.

The paper’s editorial board writes that the Environmental Protection Agency “has turned a regulatory firehouse

Apr
14
2010

EPA Standards Will Hurt Low-Income and Minority Households

This is a guest post by Dr. Charles Steele of Working People for Fair Energy.

As a former Alabama State Senator and former President of the civil rights group the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), I’ve seen first-hand how low-income families and minority groups are disproportionately affected by the rising cost of electricity. I founded Working People for Fair Energy to advocate for energy laws that are fair and affordable to all people, especially low-income families across America.

As I’ve traveled the country, I’ve heard loud and clear that the people cannot afford increased energy prices. Unfortunately, the proposed renewable