Jan
04
2018

Kicking Off 2018 and Examining the Energy Playbook

Now that the universe is properly aligned, with the University of Georgia once again playing for the national college football title, PACE has great hopes for 2018. Should that sense of optimism extend to Washington, D.C. and progress for energy consumers? This early in the year, there are more questions than answers.

First, of course, Congress and the Administration have to settle out how to pay the bills. A series of short-term spending Continuing Resolutions for FY2018 runs out soon, and until a solution is reached, there’s not enough oxygen to fully undertake other important discussions on tax extenders,

Nov
23
2017

PACE is Thankful for Progress in 2017

Borrowing from David Letterman, PACE has assembled a Top 10 list of energy policy developments, people and institutions that energy consumers can give thanks for this year. In no particular order:

Renewed efforts to (safely and in an environmentally friendly manner) explore, map and perhaps one day develop our country’s abundant natural resources. Rollback of WOTUS and the Clean Power Plan. Introduction of multiple model lines of affordable, versatile electric vehicles for commuters and commercial uses. The open and vigorous discussions of reliability/resilience, how America’s power mix is changing, and what it should look like in the future. “Energy Dominance”

Nov
21
2017

This Thanksgiving, Resilience & Reliability Still Matter

Opinions about DOE Rick Perry’s bold moves to kick-start the regulatory policy discussion regarding resiliency and reliability of the electric grid are swirling around and piling up like the abundant autumn leaves here in D.C.

And as energy lobbyists and lawyers gather around Thanksgiving dinner, many of them can give thanks for the plethora of panel discussions, op-eds and client billing opportunities the Section 403 process has yielded just since the end of September. If the process continues to generate an open discussion of what resources are needed to ensure all Americans have affordable, reliable energy across a range

Oct
17
2017

October 2017:

Although October hasn’t been officially named “Reliability Month,” it might as well have been, owing to all the recent news bearing on how our country will generate power in the future.

In Texas, a merchant power company announced the closure of two large coal-fired plants, totaling over 2300 MW of capacity across 4 units, along with a mine that supports one of the plants. The company said that the plants fell victim to “an oversupplied renewable generation market, and low natural gas prices.”

Beltway coverage focused on Texas’ lost capacity and laudatory comments from the

Oct
03
2017

Lessons on America's Power Supply Formula

The utility industry, the federal government and numerous NGOs are on the ground helping our 3.4 million fellow citizens in Puerto Rico. The Salvation Army is on the front lines and collecting much-needed donations. Our concern also extends to the victims and families impacted by the terrible events in Las Vegas.

In the wake of the hurricane trifecta of Irma, Harvey, and Maria, more Americans than usual may be thinking about power supply. Luckily, so are leading voices in Washington, D.C. and around state capitols. An already healthy debate about what sources our country uses to generate electricity, and

Aug
28
2017

Back to School with DOE's New Electricity Markets Report

The Texas coastal community, including Houston, continues to suffer the devastating effect of Hurricane Harvey. To help the relief effort, consider donating $10 to the Red Cross by texting 90999 or giving to the Salvation Army of Houston.

All over Northern Virginia, it’s time to head back to school. Adults, too, have that sense of renewal and a bit of excitement. It’s also nearly time for Congress to return and handle some weighty issues such as the debt ceiling, annual appropriations, and healthcare. With those tests ahead, it seems likely that energy policy will be just an

Jan
02
2017

New Year Offers Restart for American Energy

There can be little doubt that 2017 will witness one of the most dramatic ground shifts in American policy in recent history. The election of Donald Trump, victories by Republicans in both the U.S. House and Senate, and geopolitical pressures that continue to mount are all conspiring to create a new political landscape in our nation. We know with certainty that this administration will be markedly different than the last one, but will it be like any other? Or will it be completely uncharted territory? And most important from our point of view, what will this new landscape mean for